• IStructE Conference on
    Structural Engineering in Hazard Mitigation 2013
    • Palace of Westminster
      London
    • Tiananmen Square
      Beijing
    • Tongji Architectural Design (TJAD)
      Shanghai
    • Tower Bridge
      London
    • Tsinghua University
      Beijing
    • Tsinghua University
      Beijing
    • Tongji University
      Shanghai

Keynote Speaker

Prof. Nelson Lam

Prof. Nelson Lam

Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne
Displacement Based Seismic Design Principles as applied to Regions of Low and Moderate Seismicity

Prof. Nelson Lam, Reader in Civil Engineering at The University of Melbourne, has 30 years of experience in the professional practice and research in structural engineering. In the past 20 years, Prof. Lam has been working in the specialized field of earthquake engineering and impact dynamics. His achievement in research and knowledge transfer in this field was recognized by the award of the Chapman Medal (1999 & 2010), Warren Medal (2006) by Engineers Australia, and the Best Paper Award (2004 to 2007) by the ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology. Prof. Lam served as member of the Technical Committee for developing the current edition of the Standard for Earthquake Actions for Australia, and was co-editor of the Standards Commentary.

Abstract

Displacement based seismic design principles have become well known following the publication of well circulated textbooks co-authored by champions in this field. Whilst the bulk of the research has been targeting at conditions of high seismicity, the gradual adaptation of displacement principles to seismic design codifications for countries of low and moderate seismicity is a positive emerging trend. This codification development is paralleled by research into the behaviour of non-ductile structural systems typifying these countries. This presentation introduces an effective use of displacement principles for assessing the risk of overturning and also modelling techniques for assessing drifts of structural systems featuring horizontal, or vertical, irregularities and non-ductile behaviour. Importantly, assessment methods found on displacement principles can be used for identifying existing structures that are most vulnerable in order that resources can be deployed effectively to alleviate disasters.

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The website will be up-dated monthly. This is the Oct 2013 version